Digital Health, Apps, and Privacy: Is your personal data well protected?*

Ellen Xu  Student Writer, Windsor Law LTEC Lab J.D., 2019   The convenience of today’s technology makes it possible to track your health and fitness with your phone. The Apple Health app can track your sleeping hours, your weight, your diet, and the amount of physical activity you’re doing. The convenience of mobile apps on our smartphones today help us remain aware of our physical health or can be used to implement healthier lifestyle habits. Technology also has become a helpful addition to medical records systems, allowing hospitals to now store patient data electronically, in addition to, or even in replacement of, paper records. Given the fast pace in which technology is developing, it is important to understand your privacy rights, how your information is being handled, and how y ...

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Copyright Users and Personal Property in the Digital Economy

Monica Carinci Student Writer, Windsor Law LTEC Lab  J.D., 2018   What is ownership? This was the question on everyone’s minds at LTEC Lab’s Faculty Seminar, “Copyright Users and Personal Property in Digital Economy.” Hosted at the University of Windsor’s EPICentre on April 6, 2018, the event was a conversation between Aaron Perzanowski, Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Law, and Pascale Chapdelaine, Associate Professor at Windsor Law and Chair of LTEC Lab (www.lteclab.com). The speakers were brought together to discuss their recent publications, Professor Chapdelaine’s Copyright User’s Rights: Contracts and the Erosion of Property(OUP, 2017) and Professor Perzanowski’s The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy (MIT Press, 2016) (co-authored w ...

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Beyond Airspace Safety: A Feminist Perspective on Drone Privacy Regulation

Prof. Kristen Thomasen Assistant Professor, University of Windsor, Faculty of Law   ABSTRACT:  The impact of drones on women’s privacy has recently garnered sensational attention in media and popular discussions. Media headlines splash stories about drones spying on sunbathing or naked women and girls, drones being used to stalk women through public spaces, and drones delivering abortion pills to women who might otherwise lack access. Yet despite this popular attention, and the immense literature that has emerged analyzing the privacy implications of drone technology, questions about how the drone might enhance or undermine women’s privacy in particular have not yet been the subject of significant academic analysis. This paper contributes to the growing drone privacy literature by exa ...

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Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) Webinar: IP Foundations for Women Entrepreneurs

Madiha Khan, Student Writer, Windsor Law LTEC Lab Dual J.D., 2019   On November 18, 2017, the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) hosted a webinar for current and aspiring female entrepreneurs, with a special focus on how intellectual property (IP) can be utilized to enhance business outcomes. The webinar was delivered by Darlene Carreau, the Director General of CIPO’s Business Services Branch, and covered the importance of IP, the various types of IP,  as well as advice and tips for IP strategy. Although the information provided was not tailored specifically towards women, the webinar provided a supportive space for female innovators and business owners to learn about IP together.  As well, since many of the participants were female entrepreneurs and business owners ra ...

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Another Win for Nintendo Giant: A Review of the Federal Court’s Decision on Technological Protection Measures

Monica Carinci Student Writer, Windsor Law LTEC Lab J.D., 2018   In 2012, a separate legal framework was added to Canada’s Copyright Act (“the Act”), which prohibits the circumvention of technological protection measures (“TPMs”) and manufacturing and offering for sale devices that allow for the circumvention of TPMs. This framework was first applied by the Federal Court earlier this year in Nintendo of America Inc v Go Cyber Shopping (2005) Ltd et al., 2017 FC 246. Nintendo has been vehemently battling the piracy of its video games in different jurisdictions, and the Canadian decision illustrates the far reaching application of TPMs in Canada.   What are technological protection measures?   Under s. 41 of the Act, TPMs are defined as “any effective technology, device, or co ...

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Canada’s Emerging Artificial Intelligence Leadership and the Need for Good Policy

Joanna Pawlowski Research Assistant, Windsor Law LTEC Lab J.D., 2019   Artificial intelligence is a significant and growing part of our daily lives. Artificial intelligence is a field of computer science research that studies and develops intelligent machines that act and work like humans through the use of techniques like machine learning (providing computers with the ability to learn patters from data, rather than being directly programmed with those patterns). Today, not only is artificial intelligence prevalent across many prominent industries (manufacturing, healthcare, transportation, and customer service), but artificial intelligence already possesses the generic powers of creation and destruction. Google’s Deep Dream creates its own art using its machine learning algorithms, while ...

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Attorneys on Amazon? Online Marketplaces for Legal Services

Man sitting at laptop computer searching the Law Society of Upper Canada- Law Society Referral Service Website

Noel Semple Assistant Professor University of Windsor, Faculty of Law   For an individual with a legal need, shopping intelligently for a law firm can be a frustrating experience. It is difficult to get any objective information about price or quality, and comparison-shopping is arduous. Are online marketplaces, which play an increasingly central role in the consumer economy, part of the solution to this access to justice problem?   The Canadian Bar Association thinks so.  The CBA’s Futures Report called for a “full-blown technology-enabled marketplace where sellers of legal services can present their offerings, credentials and fee structures.”  In such a marketplace, consumers would be able to “choose the types of services they wish to purchase,” and “investigate a s ...

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Global Takedowns on Google: Canada leading the way, but are we going in the right direction?

Google Logo

Monica Carinci Student Writer, Windsor Law LTEC Lab  J.D., 2018   On Thursday June 28, 2017 the Supreme Court of Canada (the “SCC”) released its highly anticipated decision in the Google Inc. v Equustek Solution Inc. case. The case involves the intersection of censorship, freedom of expression and anti-competition in the context of technology.   Equustek, a manufacturer of networking devices, sought an injunction that would force Google  to de-index the website of Equustek’s distributor-turned-competitor, Datalink. Datalink was formerly a distributor of Equustek’s products, until Equustek sued Datalink for infringing its intellectual property rights in 2011.  Datalink passed off Equustek’s products as their own by relabeling and repackaging the goods, and also used trade secrets ...

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Architectural Drawings, Drafting Software, and the Scope of Copyright Protection-

Photo of Dragana Bukejlovic standing in front of brick wall.

Dragana Bukejlovic Student Writer, Windsor Law LTEC Lab J.D., 2018 June 21, 2017 Technological advancement has had a substantial impact on many industries throughout the last century.  Computer software has enabled professionals and every day users to perform their work in a more efficient way. Drafting software has had an impact on the architectural industry in particular. Gone are the days of architectural technologists and architects manually drafting hundreds of pages of blueprints or manually constructing 3D models of proposed buildings. Prior to attending Windsor Law, I worked as a Junior Mechanical Estimator. I was trained to read mechanical drawings, and while I am now in law school, I have taken opportunities to bridge my previous work experience with areas of the law I am explori ...

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To Scan or Not to Scan

Monica Carinci Student Writer, Windsor Law LTEC Lab  J.D., 2018   In 2012, the Copyright Modernization Act came into force, adding “education” to the list of fair dealing purposes that do not infringe copyright. Concordia University’s Centre for Expanded Poetics [the “Centre”] appears to have either relied on the expanded definition of fair dealing, or on their licence agreement with a copyright collective; since as early as 2015, the Centre has scanned books written by poets and made these texts available online for students and the general public to access for free. This activity went unnoticed until earlier this year, when the Writers’ Union of Canada and The Globe and Mail contacted the publishers of the texts reproduced online and asked if the Centre had requested their permissio ...

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